Admiral Consulting Group interviews Kerry Rosvold about the NAVUG

navugatconvvideopixAdmiral Consulting Group, a partner from the east coast, interviewed me about the benefits of belonging to the NAUG (user group).

Follow the link to get to the video on You Tube or view the article here.


Social media at Microsoft Convergence 2013 from the official blogger viewpoint

Jon Rivers of Data Masons is doing a multi-part series “Convergence Climbs the Social Ladder” featuring the views of the official Microsoft-appointed Convergence bloggers.  I got a chance to participate this year as one of those bloggers, so thought I’d share Jon’s article with you, especially since he interviews me in this article! Make sure to check out the rest of the series, where he’s interviewed (so far) Microsoft MVPs Gus Gonzalez, Belinda Allen, and Joris de Gruyter.

2013convConvergence was huge for many reasons, one of which was the prominent emphasis on the social community.   Prior to the event, Microsoft tapped 11 bloggers to serve as the conference’s official bloggers and promoted the social community with its release of the Live Wall.  Once onsite we heard from Wayne Morris, Corp VP of Microsoft Business Solutions Marketing, about the integration of mobile and social capabilities within its go-forward strategy.  The Result… A measurable growth in the Microsoft Dynamics social community with a very impressive ranking for the Twitter hashtag #CONV13, climbing to one of the top 10 trending hashtags for the week (that’s global, that’s a huge success!)

On that success, featured Convergence 2013 Official Blogger: Kerry Rosvold, Microsoft Dynamics NAV user since 2004 and blogger for www.dynamicsnavfinancials.com, shares her thoughts on the Dynamics social community:

follow the link to see the interview . . .


View Convergence 2013 session on Microsoft Dynamics NAV dimensions here

If you’ve enjoyed this month’s 15 days of NAV dimensions series, and would like to hear me speaking about dimensions, there is now a recording out on the Convergence website as well as on the Virtual Convergence website.

If you were a registered Microsoft Dynamics Convergence 2013 attendee, log in to the Convergence site and bring up the Schedule Builder. From here you can view a recording of any session that was listed as a concurrent or deep dive session, and you can even re watch the keynote and general sessions! You can search by any number of methods for my session, which was called Tips & tricks for working with dimensions in Microsoft Dynamics NAV, and ran on Thursday, March 21st at 2:30. Click the link to watch the session video.

virtualconvIf you were not able to attend Convergence this year, there is a Virtual Convergence that is available to the public. You’ll need to log in to register, but once there, you’ll have the same access as Convergence attendees to concurrent, deep dive, keynote, and general sessions. In order to find my session, search under the sessions menu, then Microsoft Dynamics NAV, then scroll down until you see the box that contains Tips & tricks for working with dimensions in Micro . . .dims virtual

There are a lot of great sessions out there available for one year past the close of Convergence 2013, so I bet these will only be out there until the end of February 2014. Take some time to explore what else is out there and share with your coworkers! This is a great way to get information into your company about the ERP you have all chosen to run your businesses.

Enjoy!


Resolving NAV dimensions errors (part 10 of 15)

Error messages related to dimensions can be the bane of a dimension-using NAV user’s existence unless you know how to properly deal with them. The number one thing I tell my end users is, “if the error message has the word dimension in it, the error is generally something you can resolve yourself”. Let’s go through three dimension errors from my system; we’ll resolve each one as we go.

derr1This message says the end-user needs to select a dimension code for team on the first line of this invoice, where they’ve entered general ledger account number 51320. For whatever reason, NAV counts lines by the 10,000, so 10000=line 1, 20000=line 2, etc. The rest of the error message is pretty self-explanatory, but is presented in an “out-of-order” way that doesn’t quite read as well as plain English. This error has occurred because we’ve set a control on the general ledger account 51320 of code mandatory for team. The end-user needs to enter a team code for every transaction that posts against this account number.

derr2

The dimension value of 522120 on the list of dimensions for project has been blocked. You can’t use it/you don’t want to use it/you shouldn’t use it. Our company goes through annually and blocks project numbers that have not been given any budget money. If I block a project, I mean it – I really don’t want anybody posting anything against it. For this error, either the person made a typo, or they were given bad coding so the solution is to either fix the typo or get a correct project number.

derr3

This is an example of a team and project combination that has been blocked for use. We do this on purpose in order to keep from making errors and to avoid needing to make reclassifying entries. For this error, the person entering the information either needs to correct a typo or get a correct project number (or team number).

Keep reading this month as we continue our series, 15 Days of NAV Dimensions.


NAV dimension priorities (part 9 of 15)

Here’s the deal with dimension priorities. Depending on what you’ve chosen for your dimension strategy, an entry could have more than one dimension proposed at the time you post it. When this happens, NAV needs a way to break the tie, and that way is dimension priorities.

dim priorities

This handy-dandy table allows you to be in control by choosing which table will take priority over the other if NAV is forced to choose. What happens if you don’t define the priority? This is where NAV’s built-in tie-breaker comes in. If you don’t define the priority, NAV will choose the table with the lowest Table ID number.

One sure way to avoid needing to do this at all is to think through your dimension strategy really carefully before you commit to it. If you define team as a dimension on both your customer master data and your item master data, and you give a customer and item different default dimensions, what’s going to happen when you post a sales order? You’re going to get a conflict where the system has to choose. Think through your strategy and I bet you can find a way to make sure that team only corresponds to customer and you could give a different dimension designation to item. By doing so, you’ve automatically designed your system not to have a conflict in the first place.

Keep reading this month as we continue our series, 15 Days of NAV Dimensions.


NAV dimension combinations for additional accuracy (part 8 of 15)

One way to get additional accuracy out of your NAV dimensions is to assign dimension combinations. Dimension combinations are really good for two things:  1) to keep you from posting something that simply doesn’t belong where you’re putting it, and 2) to keep you from posting a combination of dimensions together that don’t belong together. Let’s go through a couple of examples.

Say that, according to your dimension strategy, you’ve designated the dimension team to go with customer master data, and the dimension edition to go with item master data. If you don’t want team to ever be allowable together with edition, set a dimension combination of blocked on the grid where the two dimensions intersect.

Another example is something we do at my company. We rely very heavily on budgeted information and budget all of our product development expenses with two dimensions assigned: team and project. Each team has their own list of assigned projects and no team should ever share a project. In order to keep ourselves from having a lot of reclassification entries, we assign a dimension combination of limited on the grid where team and project intersect. dimcomboThis setting allows us to further drill down and define which projects belong to which team. If we receive bad coding or even just enter a project number incorrectly, if that project number is not one on the “approved” list of project dimensions assigned to that team, we’ll get a message that lets us know we’ve made an invalid choice before we post it into our system permanently.

Keep reading this month as we continue our series, 15 Days of NAV Dimensions.


NAVUG spotter at Convergence: general session highlights

This years’ general session didn’t start out with rock and roll music and surfboards, but rather cool Jazz and low key presentation by Jesper LaChance and Eric Tiden.  Tiden is the new NAV R&D General Manager, and has some big shoes to fill after dynamic Dan Brown left last year.  New to the NAV space, but not ERP management, Tiden said “it’s really unusual to hear people say things like “I LOVE NAV” when they’re talking about their ERP, and it’s a great responsibility to live up to!”

LaChance and Tiden kicked off the general session with celebration of stories from customers who use NAV including Habitat for Humanity, Slainte Healthcare, and All for Kidz.

It seems the theme for the session was “NAV2013 is the greatest release every (and you should upgrade)!”, and LaChance and Tiden repeatedly stressed this point and then backed it up with demos of:

  • the president role from the role center, highlighting use of charting based on account schedules which can be controlled by the end user without partner assistance
  • new assemble to order capabilities shown using the NAV web client
  • refreshable Excel information into and out of NAV, powerview wth ODATA, an Jet Express
  • a preview of the Sicily release using a Surface with the web client, Office 365 and SharePoint integration

A quick listing of next NAV version “Sicily” with a 2014 date revealed improvements to cash management, “a lot more” integration with office 365, better support for large scale hosting, and UI web services.

Customer response to the session seemed a bit luke-warm, with only scattered applause from time to time, but the room did respond well to the customer success stories, nodding and laughing, and managed to perk up at the end when given information to access a free NAV2013 Azure demo for a limited time.